Strategy

Defining your design process

Sometimes you just need to put your process into writing – especially if you’ve been operating without one. Defining the design process is not only helpful for us as designers, but it’s also helpful for our clients so they know what to expect along the way.

Working with another designer for a wide range of clients with no formal process documentation, we found that time was being wasted with late content edits that could probably have been caught up front. Jobs were taking a lot longer than they should because not all stakeholders were included in the project until there was a design proof, which meant lots of edits and redesigning – sometimes scrapping the proof and starting over from scratch because the content would change so much. We could probably save a lot of time and effort if all stakeholders weighed in and signed off on the content before we even began the design.

We laid out a pretty straightforward design process:

This new process isn’t a radical change from the way we had been working, but the goal was to reduce the number of edits we were seeing around stages 5-6. With that in mind, the biggest adjustment was in step #1 – asking clients to have their content reviewed and approved by all stakeholders in advance. This gave our clients a visual overview of how things work, what they should expect, and what it is expected of them.

Utilizing Google Docs, multiple stakeholders could review, comment and edit simultaneously, working through those major mistakes amongst themselves in one place. The goal: have all the kinks worked out ahead of time and start designing with clean and happy content.

The process above is intentionally simplified and is pretty standard in my experience (design plus 2 rounds of revisions). It may not be the best fit for everyone. You may need something more detailed that is specific to the type of work you do or your preferred style. But this is a good base for anyone who needs to put their process into writing.

Recap: Internet Summit 2015

Pre-conference Workshop

UX Strategies: Lean & Mean

This was my first time attending the pre-conference workshops at the Internet Summit, and it was 100% worth it! The workshop I chose was called "UX Strategies: Lean & Mean."

This 4-hour workshop led us through a UX process for a hypothetical new library, and we worked together to complete the following statements:

  1. This site is for...

  2. Who need...

  3. Unlike...

  4. We are...

  5. We provide...

"This site is for..." helps identify the target customer. 

"Who needs a..." is to identify features of the library.

"Unlike..." helps to identify the competition. What are the target customer's alternative options? 

"We are a..." helps to define the business. 

"We provide..." helps to define the heart of the business. What are the emotional benefits? In the case of our library, the answers included "connection," "learning," "imagination" and "inspiration." These make great selling points and also help to define the brand.

At the end of the workshop, this is how we defined the library: "."

We also received a nifty certificate of completion.

The rest of the Internet Summit

Promoting Eco-Friendly Products for Earth Day and Arbor Day

With Earth Day and Arbor Day just two days apart from one another, we planned a campaign around Rosenberry Rooms' collection of earth-friendly, organic products. This included organic furniture, bedding, mattresses, gifts and clothing. 

The items chosen to be featured in the email were selected to create a beautiful color palette, complementary to the Rosenberry Rooms brand, and each linked directly to its related category on the website.

 
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Complementary social media posts were created using the same copy and main image.

 
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My role in this campaign included copywriting, art direction, HTML email creation, and social media.